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Nigerian Journal of Nutritional Sciences

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Beverage consumption pattern among undergraduates of selected tertiary institutions in Abeokuta, Ogun State, Nigeria

Silifat Ajoke Sanni, Afolake Adeyinka Badejo, Wasiu Akinloye Afolabi

Abstract


Background: Socio-demographic and educational level of populace in Nigeria have been reported to influence the consumption of alcoholic and non-alcoholic beverages.

Objective: This study was aimed to determine the consumption pattern and factors influencing consumption of beverages by the undergraduates of selected tertiary institutions in Ogun State.

Methodology: The consumption pattern of conventional beverage was assessed using 300 undergraduates from selected tertiary institutions (Moshood Abiola Polytechnic, Federal College of Education, Federal University of Agriculture, Abeokuta) in Abeokuta, Ogun State, South West Nigeria. Pre-tested and structured questionnaire were used to gather information on drinking pattern, socio demographic and economic characteristics and beverage consumption by the respondents. Data obtained were subjected to descriptive analysis using SPSS Version 16.

Results: More female undergraduate students in the three tertiary institutions participated in the study than male. Higher percentage of the undergraduates interviewed reported drinking more of soft drinks (61%), fruit juices (57.3%), wine (43.3%), energy drinks (43.3%), gin (31%) and beer (43.7%). Over 60% of the respondents consumed beverage to increase energy, 58.0% while studying for exams and 68.3% while partying. Very few admitted always drinking while with friends (7.3%) or had feeling of guilt about drinking habit (9%) while over 70% agreed to parents` or guardians` awareness of drinking habit.

Conclusion: Higher percentage of the respondents consumed more of healthy beverage such as fruit juices and soft drinks than alcoholic drinks which might be unconnected to their basic knowledge on the health significance of these beverages.

Keywords: Consumption, beverages, students, tertiary institutions




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