Malaria Morbidity and Mortality among Nomadic Fulani Children of Northeastern Nigeria

  • SK Tidi
  • OB Akogun
  • MA Gundiri

Abstract

Malaria is a deadly disease which is widely spread in the tropical regions of the world. This study was conducted to investigate malaria morbidity and mortality in under-five nomadic Fulani children.Morbidity and mortality were assessed through film microscopy, interviews, questionnaires and verbal autopsy. Results showed that Hot body (99.6%) was the major malaria morbidity in under-five children cited by the mothers. However, there was no association (X2, p>0.05) with age, clan and parity. Almost half of the population had two episodes of fever in a year. This was significantly different (p<0.05) by age, sex and clan. About 98.5% of hot-body was observed in malaria infected individuals and was significantly. Mortality of under-five children was 113 per 1000 life births. Most (31.6%) mortality occurred between the age group 12-24 months.Males had higher rates of mortality (52.6%) as compared to their females' counterpart (47.4%). Mortality were higher (55.3%) in Kitaku clan than in other clans of the nomadic Fulani population. Children who were sick between 4-5 days died higher (48.7%) as compared to other sick days.it was shown that 92.1% attributed the causes of mortality to malaria related illness, while 7.9% to other causes.

Keywords: Malaria, Morbidity, Mortality, nomadic Fulani and film microscopy

Nigerian Journal of Parasitology,Vol. 33 [2] September 2012, pp. 149-155

Author Biographies

SK Tidi
Department of Biological Sciences,Federal University of Technology, Yola Adamawa State, Nigeria
OB Akogun
Department of Biological Sciences,Federal University of Technology, Yola Adamawa State, Nigeria
MA Gundiri
Department of Biological Sciences,Federal University of Technology, Yola Adamawa State, Nigeria
Published
2014-01-16
Section
Articles

Journal Identifiers


eISSN: 1117-4145