Haematological Parameters of Patients Attending the Geriatric Clinic of Lagos State University Teaching Hospital, Lagos, Nigeria

  • F.O. Olowoselu
  • E.I. Uche
  • O.O. Kalejaiye
  • T.A. Ekwere
  • R.A. Bamiro
  • O.A. Kareem
  • B. Augustine
  • A. Suleiman
  • H.A. Odebiyi
  • A. Balogun
  • A. Akinbami
Keywords: Geriatrics, Full blood count, Haematological parameters

Abstract

Normal aging process is related to a decline in the functional reserve of multiple organ systems which increases the probability of disease. Full blood count (or complete blood count) is one of the commonest laboratory investigations requested worldwide, and has numerous uses in the diagnosis and monitoring of different morbidities. Available literature suggest that an inverse relationship exists between most haematological parameters and age. It has been documented that aging leads to a decline in haemoglobin (Hb), packed cell volume (PCV), white blood cells (WBC) and platelet (PLT); and this suggest a reduction in bone marrow reserves. The aim of this study was to estimate the reference ranges for commonly used haematological parameters in patients attending the geriatric clinic in a Nigeria tertiary hospital. This was a descriptive cross-sectional study involving 100 geriatric patients with mean age of 71.3 + 74 years attending the Geriatric clinic of the Lagos State University Teaching Hospital. All participants' blood samples were collected and their full blood count was determined. The mean Hb concentration for the entire group was 11.43 ± 1.79g/dl with a mean of 11.84 ± 2.08 g/dl in males and 11.17 ± 1.54 g/dlin females. All these values were below the accepted reference ranges. However, the WBC and PLT counts were all within normal reference values. The mean Hb was higher in males than females and this difference was statistically significant (P= 0.01). In conclusion, evidence of lowered Hb level and normal WBC and PLT levels in the geriatrics population suggests aging may not affect all haematological indices production.

Published
2021-08-23
Section
Articles

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eISSN: 0189-0964