Seasonal prevalence of bovine fasciolosis and its direct economic losses (del) due to liver condemnation at Makurdi abattoirs north central Nigeria

  • EF Ejeh
  • BT Paul
  • FA Lawan
  • JR Lawal
  • SA Ejeh
  • IU Hambali
Keywords: Bovine fasciolosis, Economic losses, Makurdi, Prevalence, Season

Abstract

This study was conducted to report the prevalence of bovine fasciolosis and to estimate the direct  economic losses (DEL) from condemnation of liver as a result of detection of lesions of fasciolosis in cattle slaughtered in Makurdi abattoirs. Retrospective data were collected from the abattoir records obtained  from Ministry of Agriculture and Natural Resources (MANR) Makurdi, from 2008 to 2012. Direct economic losses were calculated based on a pilot study to determine the average price of liver per kilogram  (AvP/kg) and using the formula: DEL = 𝑛w × AvP/kg, where 𝑛 is the number of livers condemned and 𝑊 is the average liver weight in kg. Between 2008 and 2012, 64,978 cattle were slaughtered at Makurdi abattoirs, out of which 9,478 cattle were infected with Fasciola species. This represents an overall prevalence of 14.56% (95%, C.I.: 12.99 – 16.85%). Annual prevalence of bovine fasciolosis was  significantly (P <0.05) high in 2010 and decreased from 2011 to 2012. During the late dry season, the  prevalence of bovine fasciolosis was significantly high (P <0.05). A total of 4220 liver were condemned  during the study period. This amounted to 12660 kg and valued at ₦12,660,000.00 ($79251.60 USD). The  highest prevalence was recorded during the late dry season. However, cattle acquire the infection during  the wet season and early dry season. Pathological lesions were much obvious during the late dry season  possibly when the animals were most stressed, hence we suggest that control measures should be  targeted towards wet and early dry seasons. Bovine fasciolosis is prevalent in cattle slaughtered in  Makurdi abattoirs and accounts for huge financial losses.

Keywords: Bovine fasciolosis, Economic losses, Makurdi, Prevalence, Season

Published
2015-09-08
Section
Articles

Journal Identifiers


eISSN: 1595-093X
print ISSN: 1595-093X