Body extract of tail amputated zebrafish promotes culturing of primary fin cells from glass catfish

  • Jee Eun Han
  • Ji Hyung Kim
  • Casiano Choresca
  • Sang Phil Shin
  • Jin Woo Jun
  • Se Chang Park

Abstract

The most spectacular regenerative events in vertebrates are epimorphic regeneration. In this study, interestingly, a whole-body extract 24 h after tail amputation enhanced primary cell growth and viability compared to that of a non-tail amputated body. Additionally, these effects of extract treatment in vitro were dose-dependent occurring at concentrations of 0.02, 0.05 and 0.1 mg/ml. This is the first in vitro study on the interaction between primary fin cells from glass catfish and tail amputated body extracts of zebrafish. These results provide an essential knowledge base for rational approaches to tissue and organ regeneration.

Keywords: Cell growth, cell viability, extract, glass catfish, regeneration, zebrafish

African Journal of Biotechnology Vol. 12(12), pp. 1449-1451

Author Biographies

Jee Eun Han
Laboratory of Aquatic Biomedicine, College of Veterinary Medicine and Research Institute for Veterinary Science,
Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742, Republic of Korea
Ji Hyung Kim
Laboratory of Aquatic Biomedicine, College of Veterinary Medicine and Research Institute for Veterinary Science,
Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742, Republic of Korea; Korea Ocean Research and Development Institute, Ansan, 426-744, Republic of Korea
Casiano Choresca
Laboratory of Aquatic Biomedicine, College of Veterinary Medicine and Research Institute for Veterinary Science,
Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742, Republic of Korea
Sang Phil Shin
Laboratory of Aquatic Biomedicine, College of Veterinary Medicine and Research Institute for Veterinary Science,
Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742, Republic of Korea
Jin Woo Jun
Laboratory of Aquatic Biomedicine, College of Veterinary Medicine and Research Institute for Veterinary Science,
Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742, Republic of Korea
Se Chang Park
Laboratory of Aquatic Biomedicine, College of Veterinary Medicine and Research Institute for Veterinary Science,
Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742, Republic of Korea
Published
2016-01-19
Section
Articles

Journal Identifiers


eISSN: 1684-5315