Recombination frequencies between cultivated soybean (Glycine max) and its wild relative Glycine soja based on molecular marker analysis

  • Yue-ying Zhang
  • Qing-song Zhao
  • Chun-yan Yang
  • Meng-chen Zhang
  • Long Yan
  • Li-juan Qiu
  • Chun-ji Liu

Abstract

Close relatives of cultivated crops provide an invaluable source of genetic variation in crop improvement and exploiting such variation often forms a critical part in a breeding program. The usability of the wild soybean Glycine soja was investigated in this study by analyzing populations derived from two wide crosses between a common cultivar and two different G. soja accessions using simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers. Consistent reductions in recombination frequencies were not detected in either of these two wide crosses and the results does not seem to be confined to the particular populations or the wild genotypes used. In variance with previous reports that domestication-related traits are often controlled by one or two major loci, these recombination results strongly indicate that linkage drag should not be a major concern in transferring genes from the wild taxon into the cultigen, although backcross would still be required to minimize undesirable chromatins.

Keywords: Glycine max, Glycine soja, linkage drags, recombination frequency, molecular markers

African Journal of Biotechnology Vol. 12(22), pp. 3522-3527

Author Biographies

Yue-ying Zhang
Institute of Cereal and Oil crops, Hebei Academy of Agricultural and Forestry Sciences/ Shijiazhuang Branch Center of National Center for Soybean Improvement / the Key Laboratory of Crop Genetics and Breeding, Shijiazhuang, 050031, Peoples’ Republic of China
Qing-song Zhao
Institute of Cereal and Oil crops, Hebei Academy of Agricultural and Forestry Sciences/ Shijiazhuang Branch Center of National Center for Soybean Improvement / the Key Laboratory of Crop Genetics and Breeding, Shijiazhuang, 050031, Peoples’ Republic of China
Chun-yan Yang
Institute of Cereal and Oil crops, Hebei Academy of Agricultural and Forestry Sciences/ Shijiazhuang Branch Center of National Center for Soybean Improvement / the Key Laboratory of Crop Genetics and Breeding, Shijiazhuang, 050031, Peoples’ Republic of China
Meng-chen Zhang
Institute of Cereal and Oil crops, Hebei Academy of Agricultural and Forestry Sciences/ Shijiazhuang Branch Center of National Center for Soybean Improvement / the Key Laboratory of Crop Genetics and Breeding, Shijiazhuang, 050031, Peoples’ Republic of China
Long Yan
Institute of Cereal and Oil crops, Hebei Academy of Agricultural and Forestry Sciences/ Shijiazhuang Branch Center of National Center for Soybean Improvement / the Key Laboratory of Crop Genetics and Breeding, Shijiazhuang, 050031, Peoples’ Republic of China
Li-juan Qiu
The National Key Facility for Crop Gene Resources and Genetic Improvement (NFCRI), Institute of Crop Sciences, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Beijing, 100081, Peoples’ Republic of China.
Chun-ji Liu
CSIRO Plant Industry, 306 Carmody Road, St Lucia, Brisbane 4067, Qld, Australia.
Published
2016-03-15
Section
Articles

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eISSN: 1684-5315