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African Journal of Infectious Diseases

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Screening of crude extracts of twelve medicinal plants and “wondercure” concoction used in Nigeria unorthodox medicine for activity against mycobacterium tuberculosis isolated from tuberculosis patients sputum

I.A Adeleye, C.C Onubogu, C.I Ayolabi, A.O Isawumi, M.E Nshiogu

Abstract


The antimicrobial activity of extracts of twelve Nigerian medicinal plant species and a “wonder cure” concoction [Epa –Ijebu]; used in traditional medicine for the treatment of tuberculosis and cough were screened for activity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolated from tuberculosis patient sputum and the control strains of M. tuberculosis (H37RV). Both ethanolic and aqueous solution of the extract of Allium ascalonicum, Terminalia glaucescens, Allium cepa and Securidaca longepedunculata (ethanolic extract only) at 0.05g/ml as
well as aqueous solution of “wonder cure” concoction at same concentration inhibited the growth of M. tuberculosis. However at lower concentration of 0.2 μg/ml (critical proportion level of the control drug
(isoniazide), M. tuberculosis was resistant to both aqueous and ethanolic extracts of the plants as well as the aqueous solution of the wonder-cure concoction. The phytochemical analysis of the plant extract and the Epa- Ijebu showed the presence of bioactive compounds: tannin, flavonoid, alkaloids, phlobatannin, anthocyanin,
reducing sugar, saponin and anthraquinone. Our results offer a scientific basis for the traditional use of aqueous and ethanolic extracts of Allium ascalonicum, Terminalia glaucescens, Allium cepa, Securidaca
longepeducunlata (ethanolic extract only) and aqueous solution of the “wonder cure” concoction at higher concentration against M. tuberculosis. However local herbs such as Nicotiana tabacum, Allium sativum, Aframomum melegueta, Aprus precatorius, Xylopia aethiopica, Tetrapleura tetraptera, Crinium jagus, and Garcinia kola were ineffective.

 




http://dx.doi.org/10.4314/ajid.v2i2.55065
AJOL African Journals Online