Drivers of prenatal care quality and uptake of supervised delivery services in Ghana

  • RA Atinga
  • AA Baku
  • PB Adongo
Keywords: Antenatal care, Expectant mothers, Ghana, Quality, Skilled care

Abstract

Background: In spite of the introduction of free maternal healthcare in Ghana, utilization of supervised delivery services continues to be low due partly to poor quality of antenatal care (ANC).
Aim: The study sought to identify the determinants of perceived quality of ANC and uptake of skilled delivery services.
Subjects and Methods: A total of 363 expectant mothers were randomly selected in urban health facilities for interview. Logistic regression models were computed to examine the relative odds of reporting quality of antenatal as good and the intention to receive skilled delivery care.
Results: The odds of reporting ANC quality as good was high for women aged between 30 and 34 years. Perceived quality of ANC increases with increasing access to education but more likely to be higher for women attaining senior high education. Distance to the health facility influences quality perception, but the odds of reporting quality of care as good attenuated with proximity to the health facility. Finally, uptake of supervised delivery services was high for women aged between 35 and 39 years, women with at least junior high education; living close to the health facility and in their second and third trimester.
Conclusion: Study’s findings demonstrate the need to improve the quality of maternal health services in public health facilities to encourage women to deliver under skilled care providers.

Keywords: Antenatal care, Expectant mothers, Ghana, Quality, Skilled care

Published
2015-01-30

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print ISSN: 2141-9248