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East African Medical Journal

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A retrospective review of PID amongst women seen in GOPC and their immediate outcomes at a health facility in Nigeria between 2007-2017

M.O. Ojezele, O.N. Oborephiada, E.A. Adedapo, S.O. Ojezele

Abstract


Background: Women suffering from Pelvic Inflammatory Disease (PID) are at higher risk of infertility, regular/prolonged hospitalization making this disease a clinical and public health issue. This study aimed to investigate the reported cases of PID, associated factors and drug management of this condition by clinicians.

Design: Patients records within the study period were obtained from the medical records unit of the central secondary health to extract relevant information of all the patients diagnosed with PID.

Results: Results showed that 57 (41.6%) women were within the age range of 26 and 35 years. Also, 69 (50.4%) women were diagnosed with PID for the second time. The results showed that Chlamydia trachomatis was the most isolated organism while vaginal candidiasis (13.1%) was the most frequent co-infection. Metronidazole (68%), doxycycline (67%) and ciprofloxacin (54%) were the foremost prescribed.

Conclusions: High recurrent cases of PID observed in this study calls for investigation into probable drug resistance development and patients’ education. Finally, the observed high prevalence of PID the adolescent age group necessitates public health education in the inherent dangers of early sexual activities.


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