PROMOTING ACCESS TO AFRICAN RESEARCH

East African Medical Journal

Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

Remember me or Register



DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT Open Access  DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT Subscription or Fee Access

Effects of prescribed physical therapy exercises on blood glucose, metabolic and HbA1c profiles in pre-diabetes at Moi Teaching and Referral Hospital in Uasin Gishu County, Kenya

H.M. Muroki, N Magak, M.G. Owiti, K Onyango

Abstract


Objectives: To investigate the metabolic parameters of pre-diabetes and to provide evidence of prescribed physical therapy exercises that can be quantified and reproduced.

Design: A controlled experimental study

Setting: Moi Teaching and Referral Hospital and physical therapy gymnasium of Moi University orthopaedics and rehabilitation department in Uasin Gishu County, Kenya.

Subjects: Two comparison groups, Experimental Group (EG) and Control Group (CG) with each group having the same size of subjects (17 each).

Results: Exercise reduces Fasting Blood Glucose (FBG) by 5% and 13%, in 6 and 12 weeks, respectively. It also showed High Density Lipoprotein (HDL) were significantly higher in the experimental than in the control group during post-training (z= -3.20.17, p=0.001). On the other hand, the level of Low-Density Lipoprotein (LDL) decreased in the experimental group during both mid-training and post-training period relative to pre-training (z= -2.908.18, p=0.001). There was a significant reduction of HbA1c (of 3%) after six weeks and an even more marked drop (8%) after 12 weeks in EG compared to CG in which there was no drop in HbA1c levels. High correlation was found between FBG and HbA1c(r=0.95). All parameters at pre, mid and post training were not significantly different between males and females.

Conclusion: Prescribed Physical Therapy Exercises (PPTE) exerted improvement on FBG, metabolic and HbA1c profiles in pre-diabetes. The knowledge of how much exercise is needed to impact change in disease progression would inform the prescription of exercise by physiotherapists to their clients.




AJOL African Journals Online