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East and Central African Journal of Surgery

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The Impact of Bodaboda Motor Crashes on the Budget for Clinical Services at Mulago Hospital, Kampala

J Kigera, L Nguku, EK Naddumba

Abstract


Background: Bodabodas are a common form of transport and are becoming a major cause of road traffic accidents in Uganda. We evaluated the magnitude of injuries related to bodabodas and their impact on clinical services at Mulago hospital.

Methods: This was a retrospective review of all trauma patients who presented at Mulago hospital emergency ward between June and August 2008 following bodaboda crash. The hospital costs involved in their management were obtained from the office of the hospital statistician.

Results: Road Traffic Crashes (RTCs) were the leading cause of trauma and bodabodas were involved in 41% of all trauma patients. The average duration of stay was 8.3 days. The average cost to maintain a bodaboda patient was determined at Uganda shillings 700,359/ or the equivalent of US $369. Bodaboda injuries consumed 62.5% of the budget allocation for the directorate of surgery, Mulago Hospital.

Conclusions: Bodabodas are a major cause of traumatic injuries among cases seen in the surgical emergency department at Mulago and the costs incurred by the hospital in managing these injuries are enormous. Efforts should be made to reduce the menace that is brought about by bodaboda motorcycle crashes. Resources currently being spent on treating injuries resulting from accidents involving bodabodas would then be used to improve the care of other patients.




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