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Global Journal of Agricultural Sciences

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Role of Mass Media in Agricultural Productivity in Adamawa State, Nigeria

AA Ndaghu, VB Taru

Abstract


The study examined the role of mass media in agriculture in Adamawa State. Specifically, it focused on the extent to which mass media have been used to communicate agricultural information dissemination, farmers’ media preference, challenges experienced in accessing information through the media and the need to establish community based media. A multistage random sampling technique was adopted in selecting respondents for the study. This involved the random selection of one extension block each, from the four Agricultural Development Programme (ADP) extension zones in the state viz: Gombi, Guyuk, Mayo-belwa and Mubi. Two agricultural extension cells were then selected from each of the extension blocks and 10 farmers in each cell were randomly selected. In all 240 farmers were selected for the study. An interview schedule was used to solicit for data from the respondents. Results indicate that, majority of the farmers (69.17%) affirmed radio as the only means through which they access production information. Also, 50% of the respondents preferred television to other media available for communicating agricultural information. All the variables related to the challenges experienced by farmers in accessing information through the mass media and the perception of the community based media were significant at 5% level, attesting a strong relationship. Pest and disease control had 41.7%, improved crop varieties had 25% and weed control had 16%, these were prominent amongst agricultural information disseminated through mass media to farmers. The study suggested the establishment of a community based television stations targeted on agricultural programmes to farmer as this will go a long way in improving not only the quality of information but also its access.

KEY WORDS: Extension, Productivity, Access, Information




http://dx.doi.org/10.4314/gjass.v11i2.7
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