Utility of an orthopaedic trauma registry in Ghana

  • Elissa K. Butler Harborview Injury Prevention & Research Center, University of Washington, 325 9th Ave Box 359960, Seattle, WA, USA
  • Dominic Konadu-Yeboah Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology and Department of Surgery (Orthopaedics and Trauma), Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital, P.O. Box 1934, Kumasi, Ghana
  • Peter Konadu Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology and Department of Surgery (Orthopaedics and Trauma), Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital, P.O. Box 1934, Kumasi, Ghana
  • Dominic Awariyah Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology and Department of Surgery (Orthopaedics and Trauma), Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital, P.O. Box 1934, Kumasi, Ghana
  • Charles N. Mock Harborview Injury Prevention & Research Center, University of Washington, 325 9th Ave Box 359960, Seattle, WA, USA
Keywords: orthopaedic injury, trauma registry, Ghana, low- and middle-income country, data quality

Abstract

In most low- and middle-income countries, trauma registries are uncommon. Although institutional registries for all trauma patients are ideal, it can be more practical to institute departmental registries for specific subsets of patients. Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital (KATH) has started a locally developed, self-funded orthopaedic trauma registry. We describe methods and experiences for data collection and examine patient and injury characteristics, data quality, and the utility of the registry. Of 961 individuals in the registry, 67.9% were males, and the median age was 40 years. Motor vehicle collision (23.3%) was the most frequent mechanism of injury. Lower extremity fractures were the most common injury (60.6%), and 43.9% of injuries were managed operatively. Data quality was reasonable with missingness under 10% for 13 of 14 key variables, with inconsistencies of dates of injury, admission, treatment, and discharge in 9.1% of cases. However, the type of operation was missing for 73.2% of operative cases. Despite these limitations, the registry has been used for quality improvement and to successfully advocate for resources to improve trauma care. The registry has been improved by adding more detailed outcome variables, creating a standardised
codebook of categorical variables, and adding more fields to allow for multiple injuries. In conclusion, it is practical and sustainable to institute a locally developed, self-funded orthopaedic trauma registry in Ghana that provides data with reasonable quality. Such a registry can be used to advocate for more resources to care for injured patients adequately and for quality improvement.

Published
2021-09-30

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print ISSN: 0016-9560