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Medical Journal of Zambia

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Factors influencing guardians in children attendance of Growth Monitoring Promotion from 36 to 59 months in Zambia

Dai Moyo, Miriam Mapulanga

Abstract


Background: Growth Monitoring has been promoted as one of the key components of community nutrition programmes since the early 1980s and has revealed positive impacts on child growth outcomes by assessing growth allows capturing growth faltering before the child reaches the status of under-nutrition. But indicators reveal that the attendance of children for growth monitoring and promotion between 36 to 59 months is low in Zambia.This study therefore aimed at assessing the factors influencing guardians in children attendance of Growth Monitoring Promotion from 36 to 59 months in Zambia.

Methods: A study employing both quantitative and qualitative cross section study was conducted to assess the factors influencing guardians in children attendance of Growth Monitoring Promotion from 36 to 59 months in Zambia. The study was done in Kabwe district, Zambia. A semi-structured questionnaire was developed for data collection. 110 guardians were interviewed from 10 health facilities.

Results: The mean age was 45.7(SD 7.91) years) Most of the participants were below the age of 35 years (95%). The majority of the participants had attained secondary school education (62%). Most of them were married (87%).The study found that peers association, access and providers attitudes to the health facility and providers influenced guardians in the children attendance of growth monitoring and promotion from 36-59 months.

Conclusion: The study results show that demographic factors including guardians' education, marital status and age influences continued attendance for children in growth monitoring and promotion. Peer associations, access to the health facility f and the providers' attitudes influences guardians in health seeking behaviours in the continued attendance of children for growth monitoring and promotion.




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