Seroprevalence of Human Immunodeficiency Virus, Hepatitis B Virus, and Syphilis Infections among Pregnant Women Booked for Antenatal Care at Kogi State Specialist Hospital, Lokoja, Nigeria

  • Dorcas Salime Onuminya
  • Peter A. Isabu
  • Reuben Eifediyi
  • Joseph O. Eigbeifoh
  • Felix O. Okogbo
  • Adewole O. Sule‑Odu
Keywords: Hepatitis B virus, human immunodeficiency virus, Nigeria, pregnancy, screening, seroprevalence, syphilis

Abstract

Background: Sexually transmitted infections (STIs) among pregnant women are an important health issue in Nigeria, but its prevalence in
Lokoja is not known.

Objective: The objective of this study is to establish the seroprevalence of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), hepatitis B virus (HBV), and syphilis infections among pregnant women booked for the antenatal clinic in Kogi State Specialist Hospital, Lokoja, Nigeria, and determine risk factors associated with the infections.

Methods: We prospectively screened three hundred pregnant women booked for antenatal care between January 1, 2016, and December 31, 2016, for HIV, HBV, and syphilis. Their demographic data, risk factors, and results of the screening tests were analyzed using the SPSS version 20 and presented in simple charts, tables, and percentages.

Results: Thirty nine (13%) out of the 300 pregnant women tested seropositive for either HIV (28, 9.3%), HBV (10, 3.3%), or syphilis (one, 0.3%). The most common identifiable risk factor for these infections was multiple sexual partners which accounted for 38.4%.

Conclusions: The seroprevalence of STIs in this study was 13% and the most common risk factor for the infections was multiple sexual
partners. Therefore, effective preventive strategies for HIV, HBV, and syphilis are advocated.

Keywords: Hepatitis B virus, human immunodeficiency virus, Nigeria, pregnancy, screening, seroprevalence, syphilis

Published
2021-07-01
Section
Articles

Journal Identifiers


eISSN: 2667-0526
print ISSN: 1115-2613