Determinants of Low Back Pain among Health‑care Providers in a Federal Tertiary Hospital in Ekiti State, SouthWestern Nigeria

  • Paul Oladapo Ajayi
  • Paul Oladapo Ajayi
  • Samson Ayo Deji
  • Kayode Rasaq Adewoye
  • O.A. Atoyebi
  • Ayo Kamal Alabi
  • Oluremi Olayinka Solomon
  • Adebowale Femi Akinwumi
Keywords: Determinants, low back pain and health‑care providers, prevalence

Abstract

Introduction: Low back pain (LBP) is a usual musculoskeletal system disorder among the working population, especially among health‑care providers (HCPs). It is a significant contributor to work disability, work absenteeism, and lost hours globally. The study objectives are to find the prevalence and determinants of LBP among HCPs in a Federal Tertiary Hospital in Ido‑Ekiti, Ekiti State, Nigeria.

Subjects and Methods: A cross‑sectional study was done among HCPs in a Federal Tertiary Hospital, Ido‑Ekiti, Ekiti State, Nigeria. The study included 336 participants working in the hospital. The respondents were selected using stratified sampling. Data were collected through an adapted questionnaire, which was pretested, semi‑structured, and self‑administered. The data were analyzed using STATA  version 12. Univariate, bivariate, and binary logistic analysis was used to find the prevalence and determinants of LBP. The significance level was set at 95% confidence interval and P ≤ 0.05.

Results: The point prevalence, period prevalence, and lifetime prevalence were 39.9%, 44.6%, and 67.6%, respectively. The findings showed that the prevalence of LBP was higher among respondents who turn patient on the bed regularly (>3 times weekly) (odds ratio [OR] =18.46, 95% CL [6.84–49.81], P < 0.0001); and pulls and pushes object or people (more than 10 kg thrice a week) (OR = 8.22, 95% CL  [3.46–19.56], P < 0.0001) were statistically significant.

Conclusion: The study revealed that HCPs suffered from a high prevalence of LBP, and the identified risk factors (turning of the patient and pulling and pushing of an object or  people) can be modified using an informed health intervention program (health education and ergonomics).

Published
2021-08-24
Section
Articles

Journal Identifiers


eISSN: 2667-0526
print ISSN: 1115-2613