Ethnobotanical survey of tree species used for wound healing in Ibadan, southwest Nigeria

  • B Rafiu
  • M.A. Sonibare
Keywords: Wound healing, ethnobotanical survey, tree species, medicinal uses, conservation

Abstract

The disruption of cells and tissues at the sites of injury leads to varying degrees of wounds, which can be as a result of the physical, chemical, microbiological or immunological process. The present study reports the findings from an ethnobotanical survey of three Local Government areas (LGAs) in Ibadan, Oyo State in Southwest Nigeria, carried out to document tree species and plant parts used in the treatment of wound and related skin disorders. Semi-structured questionnaires were used to interview the herb sellers, traditional medical practitioners, and some elders in the study area comprising of Ibadan North, Ibadan Southeast and Ibadan Northwest LGAs. Eighty-five respondents were questioned on their knowledge of skin diseases and wound care management. Seventy-one plants out of which sixty-five were tree species belonging to thirty angiosperm families were identified as plant species used for the treatment of wound and related skin disorders. Some of the most frequently used tree species mentioned by the respondents are: Khaya grandifoliola C. D. C., Vitellaria paradoxa C.F. Gaertn., Xylopia aethiopica (Dunal) A. Rich, Kigelia africana (Lam.) Benth., Bombax buonopozense P. Beauv., Terminalia glauscescens Planch. ex Benth. and Lophira alata Banks ex Gaertn. The most frequently mentioned family is Fabaceae, followed by Meliaceae and Annonaceae. Stem barks were predominant in the prescription. Preparations including two or more plant species were common. However, in some cases, prescriptions were in powder form. The mode of preparation and dosages are presented in this paper. The results of this study revealed many tree species used to treat wounds and skin disorders in the three Local Government Areas surveyed in Ibadan, Southwest Nigeria.

Keywords: Wound healing, ethnobotanical survey, tree species, medicinal uses, conservation

Published
2017-03-09
Section
Articles

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eISSN: 1118-6267