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Nigerian Quarterly Journal of Hospital Medicine

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C-Reactive Protein in Healthy Adult Nigerians

MM Baba, BA Kolawole, MO Balogun, AO Akintomide, RT Ikem, FA Arogundade, ID Gezawa, H Yusuph, A Talle, H Abdul

Abstract


Background: C-reactive protein (CRP) is an acute phase reactant produced in the liver in response to tissue injury or systemic inflammation, its release is stimulated by cytokines (interleukin-6 and tumour necrosis factor-alpha). Elevated CRP levels have been linked to an increased risk of later development of diabetes mellitus and systemic hypertension. Baseline level of C-reactive protein in apparently healthy men and women predict long-term risk of a first myocardial infarction.
Method: The study design was cross-sectional conducted among apparently healthy adult relative of patients and hospital staff of the Obafemi Awolowo University Teaching Hospitals complex (OAUTHC) Ile Ife, Osun State south western Nigeria. Serum lipids and fasting blood glucose were measured, while C-reactive protein measurement was based on the principle of solid phase enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA).
Results: A total of 50 apparently healthy consecutive adult subjects were recruited into the study comprising 19 male and 31 female. There was no significant difference in mean Fasting blood glucose and serum lipids between the male and female study subjects. However, C-reactive protein was found to be higher in female compared to male, but the difference was not statistically significant.
Conclusion: This study showed that apparently healthy adult female Nigerians have higher level of C-reactive protein compared to male, but with no significant difference.


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