Perceived barriers to physical activity among Nigerian stroke survivors

  • Opeyemi Ayodiipo Idowu
  • Ade Fatai Adeniyi
  • Omoyemi Olubunmi Ogwumike
  • Henrietta Oluwafunmilola Fawole
  • Olayinka Akinrolie

Abstract

Introduction: Benefits of physical activity in the prevention and management of stroke are well documented in the literature. There is increasing evidence that stroke survivors in South-West Nigeria are physically inactive. Data on barriers to the achievement of the recommended physical activity levels including its differences along socio-demographic characteristics among stroke survivors in South-West Nigeria are needed. Methods: The Exercise Benefits and Barrier Scale and the International Physical Activity Questionnaire were administered on 121 stroke survivors to determine their perceived barriers to physical activity and physical activity levels respectively. Information on socio-demographic data and clinical variables were also collected. Results: The sample included 70.2% males, with majority of the participants reporting low physical activity levels (80.2%) and high perceived barriers (Mean=48.13, SD=7.88). The four most reported common barriers among stroke survivors were access to exercise facilities (95.0 %), being embarrassed to exercise (94.2%), economic cost demands of exercise (94.2 %) and notion that people in exercise clothes look funny (94.2%) respectively. There were no significant differences found in barriers to physical activity between gender (U= 1471.00, P= 0.74) and across each of: occupational status (H= 4.37, P=0.22), age group (H= 0.82, P= 0.84) and educational levels (H= 4.56, P= 0.33). Significant difference however existed in perceived barriers across marital status categories (H=12.87, P= 0.05). Conclusion: Stroke survivors indicated high perceived barriers to physical activity and these barriers were associated with marital status.

Pan African Medical Journal 2015; 21

Author Biographies

Opeyemi Ayodiipo Idowu
Department of Physiotherapy, School of Basic Medical Sciences, College of Medical Sciences, University of Benin, Benin-City, Nigeria
Ade Fatai Adeniyi
Department of Physiotherapy, College of Medicine, University of Ibadan, Nigeria
Omoyemi Olubunmi Ogwumike
Department of Physiotherapy, College of Medicine, University of Ibadan, Nigeria
Henrietta Oluwafunmilola Fawole
Department of Physiotherapy, School of Basic Medical Sciences, College of Medical Sciences, University of Benin, Benin-City, Nigeria
Olayinka Akinrolie
Centre for Research and Ageing, Faculty of Social and Human Sciences, University of Southampton, England
Published
2016-07-20
Section
Articles

Journal Identifiers


eISSN: 1937-8688