Effect of HIV infection on TB treatment outcomes and time to mortality in two urban hospitals in Ghana-a retrospective cohort study

  • Lily Ogyiri Department of Population, Family and Reproductive Health, School of Public Health, University of Ghana, Ghana
  • Margaret Lartey Department of Medicine, School of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Ghana, Ghana
  • Oluwayemisi Ojewale Department of Medicine, College of Medicine, University of Florida, USA
  • Andrew Anthony Adjei Department of Medicine, School of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Ghana, Ghana
  • Awewura Kwara Department of Medicine, College of Medicine, University of Florida, USA
  • Richard Mawuena Adanu epartment of Population, Family and Reproductive Health, School of Public Health, University of Ghana, Ghana
  • Kwasi Torpey Department of Population, Family and Reproductive Health, School of Public Health, University of Ghana, Ghana
Keywords: Tuberculosis; TB/HIV co-infection; treatment success; mortality

Abstract

Introduction: Tuberculosis (TB) is currently causing more deaths than Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) globally. Ghana as one of the 30 high burden TB/HIV countries has a high annual TB case-fatality rate of 10%. The study sought to assess the effect of HIV infection on TB treatment outcomes and assess the time to mortality after treatment onset.

Methods: we conducted a review of treatment files of TB patients who were treated from January 2013 to December 2015 in two urban hospitals in the Accra Metropolis. Modified Poisson regression analysis was used to measure the association between HIV infection and TB treatment outcomes. Kaplan-Meier survival estimates were used to plot survival curves.

Results: seventy-seven percent (83/107) of HIV infected individuals had successful treatment, compared to 91.2% (382/419) treatment success among HIV non-infected individuals. The proportion of HIV-positive individuals who died was 21.5% (23/107) whilst that of HIV-negative individuals was 5.5% (23/419). Being HIV-positive increased the risk of adverse outcome relative to successful outcome by a factor of 2.89(95% CI 1.76-4.74). The total number of deaths recorded within the treatment period was 46; of which 29(63%) occurred within the first two months of TB treatment. The highest mortality rate observed was among HIV infected persons (38.6/1000 person months). Of the 107 TB/HIV co-infected patients, 4(3.7%) initiated ART during TB treatment.

Conclusion: the uptake of ART in co-infected individuals in this study was very low. Measures should be put in place to improve ART coverage among persons with TB/HIV co-infection to help reduce mortality.

Published
2019-04-26
Section
Articles

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eISSN: 1937-8688