Knowledge, risk-perception, and uptake of COVID-19 prevention measures in sub-Saharan Africa: a scoping review

  • Joseph KB Matovu
  • Alex Mulyowa
  • Rogers Akorimo
  • Daniel Kirumira
Keywords: COVID-19; prevention; sub-Saharan Africa.

Abstract

Background: The COVID-19 pandemic has almost affected the entire globe and is currently in a resurgent phase within the sub-Saharan African region.

Objective: This paper presents results from a scoping review of literature on knowledge, risk-perception, conspiracy theories and uptake of COVID-19 prevention measures in sub-Saharan Africa.

Methods: We used the following search terms: ‘COVID-19’, ‘knowledge’, ‘perceptions’, ‘perspectives’, ‘misconceptions’, ‘conspiracy theories’, ‘practices’ and ‘sub-Saharan Africa’. Basing on the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses extension for scoping reviews (PRISMA-ScR) guidelines, we identified 466 articles for review; 36 articles met the inclusion criteria. We extracted data on knowledge, risk-perception, conspiracy theories and uptake of COVID-19 primary prevention measures.

Results: Knowledge of COVID-19 was high (91.3-100%) and associated with age and education; risk-perception was equally high (73.3-86.9%) but varied across studies. Uptake of hand-washing with water and soap or hand-sanitizing ranged between 63-96.4%, but wearing of face masks and social distancing fared poorly (face masks: 2.7%-37%; social distancing: 19-43%).

Conclusion: While knowledge of COVID-19 is nearly universal, uptake of COVID-19 prevention measures remains sub-optimal to defeat the pandemic. These findings suggest a need for continued health promotion to increase uptake of the recommended COVID-19 prevention measures in sub-Saharan Africa.

Keywords: COVID-19; prevention; sub-Saharan Africa.

Published
2022-10-28
Section
Articles

Journal Identifiers


eISSN: 1729-0503
print ISSN: 1680-6905