Kusvika taparadzaniswa nerufu' (Until death do us part)

  • N Spark-du Preez1 Human Sciences Department, Loughborough University, Leicestershire, LE11 3TU, United Kingdom
  • B Zaba Centre for Population Studies, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London University, 49–51 Bedford Square, London WC1B 3DP, United Kingdom
  • C Nyamukapa Biomedical Research and Training Institute, University of Zimbabwe Campus, PO Box CY1753, Causeway, Harare, Zimbabwe
  • M Mlilo Biomedical Research and Training Institute, University of Zimbabwe Campus, PO Box CY1753, Causeway, Harare, Zimbabwe
  • S Gregson Biomedical Research and Training Institute, University of Zimbabwe Campus, PO Box CY1753, Causeway, Harare, Zimbabwe <br>Department of Infectious Disease Epidemiology, Imperial College Faculty of Medicine, University of London, Norfolk Place, London W2 1P
Keywords: HIV, marital status, rural, Zimbabwe

Abstract

A cross-sectional study of 7 667 non-virgins between 15 and 54 years of age was carried out to assess the protective effect of marriage against HIV acquisition in a rural population in Zimbabwe, whilst taking into account gender-differentials in risk factors for seroconversion. Persons in stable first marriages and long-term consensual cohabiting unions had higher odds of HIV infection than never-married people but a lower risk than those who had been divorced or widowed, even after adjusting for known confounders and significant risk factors for infection. Partner-related risk factors appear to play a more pivotal role in determining HIV prevalence in females than for males, for whom personal sexual behaviour risk factors are more dominant.

Keywords: HIV, marital status, rural, Zimbabwe

African Journal of AIDS Research 2004, 3(1): 81–91
Published
2005-01-06
Section
Articles

Journal Identifiers


eISSN: 1608-5906
print ISSN: 1727-9445