Personality and Fear of Terrorist attacks in Ghana: The mediating role of Risk Perception

  • Feikoab Parimah
  • Courage Collins Kofi
  • Anakwah Nkansah
  • Joseph Yaw Opoku
Keywords: Risk perception, Fear, Terrorist attack, Conscientiousness, Neuroticism, Personality

Abstract

The study aimed at determining whether or not neuroticism would account for more variance in predicting risk perception and fear of terrorist attack in Ghana compared to conscientiousness. Moreover, it sought to examine the mediating effect of risk perception on the relationship between neuroticism and fear of terrorist attack. To this end, two hundred and forty one (241) undergraduates were conveniently sampled from the University of Ghana. The sample consisted 119 (49.4%) males and 122 (50.6%) females, with a mean age of 22.16 (SD=2.71). A hierarchical multiple regression showed that both neuroticism and conscientiousness failed to significantly predict risk perception and fear of terrorist attack. Although a significant positive relationship was found between risk perception and fear of terrorist attack, nevertheless risk perception could not mediate the relationship between neuroticism and fear of terrorist attack. By showing that the extent to which one feels personally vulnerable to terrorist attack is linked to the degree to which they see their community to be at risk of such attacks, it is recommended that students be sensitized to the unpredictable nature of terrorist attacks, and the need to see their campus as been vulnerable. This is likely to get them prepared for possible terrorist attacks.

Key words: Risk perception, Fear, Terrorist attack, Conscientiousness, Neuroticism, Personality

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Articles

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eISSN: 1117-1421