Roles of Perceived Locus of Causality, Social Distance and Gender on Willingness to Volunteer in Nigeria Local Community

  • Chiedozie Okechukwu Okafor
  • Vivian Chizoma Njemanze
  • Edwin C. Onyeneje
Keywords: Volunteerism; Social distance; Perceived locus of causality; Gender; Nigeria; Local culture

Abstract

The present study investigated potential enhancement factors in relation to volunteerism. Specifically, we examined how perceived locus of causality, social distance and gender may influence willingness to volunteer help for victims of road accident. The study was based on a controlled experiment among students of a university (N = 80). Hypotheses were tested simultaneously in a univariate analysis which showed non-significant influence of perceived locus of causality (H1, p > .05); significant influence of social distance (H2, p < .05); non-significant influence of gender (H3, p > .05); significant interaction of perceived locus of causality and gender (p < .01), and significant interaction of perceived locus of causality, social distance and gender on willingness to volunteer (H4, p < .01). That is, people were more willing to help when those in need are related to them. The present study contributes to theory within this research field which explain African disposition by showing that kinship and familiarity are significant predictors of willingness to provide help for victims of disaster. However, the researchers encourage all Nigerians to look beyond family ties and affiliations in providing help to people in need.

Key Words: Volunteerism; Social distance; Perceived locus of causality; Gender; Nigeria; Local culture

Published
2020-04-28
Section
Articles

Journal Identifiers


eISSN: 2227-5452
print ISSN: 2225-8590