Assessing Payment and Community Based Distribution Issues in Establishing Demand-Responsive Systems for Community –Based Distribution of Insecticide Treated Nets in South East Nigeria.

  • Obinna Onwujekwe Health Policy Research Unit, Department of Pharmacology and Therapeutics, College of Medicine, University of Nigeria, Enugu Campus.
  • Douglas Nwagbo Department of Community Medicine, University of Nigeria, Enugu Campus.
  • Elvis Shu Health Policy Research Unit, Department of Pharmacology and Therapeutics, College of Medicine, University of Nigeria, Enugu Campus.
  • Samuel Ghasi Health Policy Research Unit, Department of Pharmacology and Therapeutics, College of Medicine, University of Nigeria, Enugu Campus.
  • Benjamin Uzochukwu Department of Community Medicine, University of Nigeria, Enugu Campus.
  • Angus Onyido National Arbovirus and Vector Research Division, Federal Ministry of Health, Enugu.
  • Obiora Onwuamaeze Health Policy Research Unit, Department of Pharmacology and Therapeutics, College of Medicine, University of Nigeria, Enugu Campus.

Abstract

Objectives: To assess the payment of pricing factors necessary for achieving optimal community-based distribution of insecticide nets (ITNs) re-treatment services.

Methods: Questionnaire interviews were conducted with randomly selected household heads or their representatives in five malaria holo-endemic communities of Southeast Nigeria. Interviews were also held with community leaders before and after ITNs sales. The sale of ITNs was based on the communities' distribution and payment preferences.

Findings: While payment by installment was preferred for ITNs, it was one-off mechanism for net re-treatment. Most of the respondents that bought the nets paid by a maximum of two fourth-nightly installments, and some of them determined the mark-up price of ITNs over that for untreated nets before buying. The major problems encountered were cases of non-adherence to the payment modality and return of after use. A community-based system was able to sell the nets.

Conclusion: The payment preference of communities should be incorporated in

implementing community-based ITNs sales. Appropriate pricing should involve ITNs programme managers being aware of the price movements in local markets for untreated nets, as a basis for dynamic reasonable price setting for ITNs

Key words: Demand responsive, malaria, insecticide-treated nets, financing, community-based.

[Jnl College of Medicine Vol.8(2) 2003: 36-39]

Author Biography

Obinna Onwujekwe, Health Policy Research Unit, Department of Pharmacology and Therapeutics, College of Medicine, University of Nigeria, Enugu Campus.
Gates Malaria Partnership, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London
Published
2004-02-03
Section
Articles

Journal Identifiers


eISSN: 1118-2601