HANDLING, SAFETY AND HYGIENIC PRACTICES OF FROZEN MEAT AND FISH DURING VENDING IN THE KUMASI METROPOLIS

  • Antoinette Simpah Anim-Jnr (PhD) Department of Animal Science, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology
  • Abena Boakye (PhD)
  • Seth Etuah (PhD) Department of Agricultural Economics, Agribusiness and Extension, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology
  • Prof. Christopher Antwi Department of Animal Science Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology
  • William Appaw Department of Food Science and Technology, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology
  • Prof. Stephen Alfred Osei Department of Animal Science, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology
  • Prof. Ibok Oduro Department of Food Science and Technology, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology
  • Prof. William Otoo Ellis Department of Food Science and Technology, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology
Keywords: consumers, table-top vendors, cold store operators, hygienic practices, frozen meat and fish

Abstract

This study assessed the extent to which cold store operators and table-top meat and fish sellers in Kumasi, employed safe meat and fish handling practices.  The meat and fish safety knowledge and attitudes of food vendors and household consumers were also assessed. Data was collected from 155 respondents comprising 53 cold store operators, 42 table-top vendors and 60 consumers using semi-structured questionnaires. The majority of respondents were females aged between 20 – 40 years. Cold store operators were generally more educated than the table-top meat and fish sellers who had only basic or no formal education. However, formal education had little effect on respondents’ knowledge and adoption of meat     

 handling and safety practices. Neither meat and fish vendors nor consumers considered hygiene as necessary in their selection of suppliers and purchase of products. Although most claimed to be aware of meat and fish contaminants, they could not mention specific pathogens that contaminated either products. While most table-top vendors wore overalls, the purpose was not to reduce contamination of meat and fish but to promote personal cleanliness. The findings indicate the need for further studies and interventions to bridge the existing gap between knowledge and practice in the frozen meat and fish industry. We propose a conceptual framework for an integrated approach involving all key stakeholders for safe vending of frozen fish and meat. Other urban cities in developing nations could adopt the framework to promote safe and hygienic practices in the frozen meat and fish industry.

Author Biographies

Antoinette Simpah Anim-Jnr (PhD), Department of Animal Science, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology

Antoinette Simpah Anim-Jnr is a Member of faculty at the Department of Animal Science, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology (KNUST), Kumasi, Ghana. She holds a BSc in Agriculture from KNUST, an MSc in Meat Science and Technology from the University of Bristol, UK, and a PhD in Animal Science from Massey University, New Zealand. Her research focuses on meat as food, specifically the effects of production systems on meat eating quality, composition and shelf life. Her current research interest is on exploiting underutilised non-conventional feed resources as potential sources of nutrients and phytochemicals to improve farm animal nutrition and the quality of meat products.

Abena Boakye (PhD)

Abena Boakye holds a PhD in Food Science and Technology and is a member of faculty at the Department of Food Science and Technology at the KNUST in Ghana. Her research spans Food compositional studies that exploit the health benefits of crops, Food product development/ value addition interventions to underutilised species and Sensory Science. She has professional certification in Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Point (HACCP), Quality Assurance and Control for Food Manufacturing and also consults for institutions and businesses on Food Product Development, Process Modification and Standardization as well as Sensory Evaluation of Products.

Seth Etuah (PhD), Department of Agricultural Economics, Agribusiness and Extension, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology

Seth Etuah is a Lecturer at the Department of Agricultural Economics, Agribusiness and Extension of KNUST, Kumasi. He holds a PhD in Agricultural Economics from KNUST. His research focuses on food and consumer economics, efficiency and productivity analysis, impact assessment, market integration/price transmission and price volatility.

Prof. Christopher Antwi, Department of Animal Science Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology

Christopher Antwi is an Associate Professor at the Department of Animal Science Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology (KNUST), Kumasi, Ghana. He holds a PhD (Animal Science) from the same University.  His research areas are Greenhouse gas mitigation and emissions from animal agriculture, animal adaptation to climate change, fodder conservation and feed improvement for enhanced productivity of ruminant livestock.

William Appaw, Department of Food Science and Technology, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology

William Appaw is a food toxicologist and research analyst with the Mycotoxin and Food Analysis Laboratories in the Department of Food Science and Technology in the College of Science at Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology in Kumasi, Ghana. He analyzes food for toxins, adulterants and develops mitigation interventions. He has a strong interest in development of smart analytical tools for food toxin and adulteration detection. He is responsible for skills development in the areas of continuous improvement, leadership and technical knowledge for stakeholders in the food and health industries. His current research is focused on the importance of mycotoxin in human health, nutrition and risk assessment.

 

Prof. Stephen Alfred Osei, Department of Animal Science, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology

Stephen Alfred Osei is a Professor in the Department of Animal Science, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, Kumasi, Ghana. His academic and research interests are in the areas of monogastric nutrition and reproductive and endocrine physiology of farm animals.

Prof. Ibok Oduro, Department of Food Science and Technology, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology

Ibok Oduro is a Professor of Postharvest Technology at the Department of Food Science and Technology, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology (KNUST), Kumasi, Ghana. She is the immediate past Provost of the College of Science and the first woman to occupy that position in the University. Her research is dedicated to promoting indigenous and underutilized food crops in West Africa, through value addition. She has authored numerous publications and her research continues to evolve and her current interests include transforming food waste into useful products. Her achievements have earned her both national and international recognition.

 

Prof. William Otoo Ellis, Department of Food Science and Technology, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology

William Otoo Ellis is a Professor of Food Science at the Department of Food Science and Technology, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology (KNUST), Kumasi. He has more than 27 years of experience working in academia and related organizations and civil society. His research interest span Applied Microbiology and Quality Assurance; Food Product Development and Packaging and Food Toxicology and Epidemiology. He has several publications to his credit.

Published
2022-05-20

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eISSN: 0855-0395