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Nigerian Journal of Animal Production

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Effects of feed forms, levels of quantitative feed restriction on performance, carcass quality and cost benefit of broiler chickens

D J Omosebi, O A Adeyemi, O M Sogunle, O M O Idowu

Abstract


A 56-day feeding trial was conducted to evaluate the effects of feed forms and levels of feed restriction on growth performance, carcass quality and feeding cost of broiler chickens. One hundred and ninety-two day-old broiler chicks were divided into eight groups of twenty four birds each. Each group was further divided into three replicates of eight birds per replicate in a completely randomized design. Birds were fed mash and pellets and restricted at 0, 10, 20 and 30% levels of feed restriction. Data were collected on growth performance, carcass characteristics, and cost benefits were calculated. Data were subjected to analysis of variance. The results showed significantly higher (p<0.05) final weights and weight gain in birds fed pellets (1624.42 g and 1571.72 g) compared to mash (1540.00 g and 1487.26 g). Feed intake of broiler chicken was significantly influenced by interaction between feed forms and levels of feed restriction. Feed conversion ratio was best in birds fed pellets (2.35) and at 30% level of restriction (2.09). Retail cuts parts were not significantly (p>0.05) affected by feed forms and levels of restriction. Gizzard weights increased (p<0.05) with increasing levels of restriction. Abdominal fat decreased (p<0.05) with increasing levels of restriction. Birds restricted at 30% level showed a better feed cost savings compared with ad libitum feeding. It can be concluded that feeding pellets to broiler chickens improved weight gain and feed conversion. Feed restriction at 30% level of restriction reduced feeding cost and abdominal fat.

Keywords: Broilers, carcass, performance, quantitative feed restriction




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