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Nigerian Journal of Parasitology

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Prevalence of malaria parasites and Hepatitis-B virus in patients attending two hospitals in Jos, Plateau State, Nigeria

JA Yohanna, AA Iorkyaa, JI Rotimi, BMW Nwibari, PA Igavo, DA Dakul

Abstract


Malaria and Hepatitis-B virus (HBV) remain a threat to human health in many developing nations. Many regions with high malaria prevalence are also endemic for other infectious diseases which may predispose them to more of the malaria infection. Using thin and thick film preparations, malaria parasites were detected, identified and the intensity determined. Also by the use of the HBsAg rapid test strip, HBV surface antigen in sera obtained from consented and willing patients attending two hospitals in Jos were tested. Seven hundred and fifty (750) blood samples were examined, 61.10% were <15 years old while 38.19% were older (>15 years old). Three hundred and ninety nine (53.20%) were found infected with malaria, 11.6% with HBV and 6.19 had co-infection. There was significant difference in prevalence of malaria at p>0.05 being 74.69% in <15 years old and 25.31% in the >15 years old. For Hepatitis-B, there was also significant difference in the older (87.64%) as against the younger (12.36%) age-group. For co-infection, it was significantly higher at (p>0.05) in the older (91.20%) than in the younger (8.70%) age-group. No significant difference was observed for HBV between males and females but for malaria and co-infection it was higher in the males. The intensity of malaria parasites revealed +51.13%, ++46.12% and +++ in 2.76% of the infected. The survey showed that prevalence of malaria and HBV were high and pose serious health threats. Therefore government agencies NGO’s cooperate organization and individuals, should put in more efforts in advocacy towards behavioural changes that expose people to infections, campaign for immunization for all ages and making drugs more readily available towards the control of these diseases.

Keywords: malaria, Hepatitis-B virus, co-infection, prevalence, intensity




http://dx.doi.org/10.4314/njpar.v37i1.17
AJOL African Journals Online