Towards the professionalisation of editing in South Africa

  • Melanie Ann Law School of Languages, North-West University, Vaal Triangle Campus, PO Box 1174, Vanderbijlpark 1900, South Africa
  • Haidee Kruger School of Languages, North-West University, Vaal Triangle Campus, PO Box 1174, Vanderbijlpark 1900, South Africa

Abstract

In South Africa, the professional status of editors remains largely undefined. In certain industries, such as the publishing industry, editing is regarded as a professional activity, requiring well-defined, high-level skills linked to particular qualifications and experience. In other sectors, editing is regarded as an activity that can be done by anyone with an aptitude for languages. At present, editors in South Africa do not need to obtain any form of professional accreditation in order to practice legally. The South African Translators' Institute (SATI) does offer the option of accreditation in editing, but this is in no way enforceable. This article addresses issues surrounding the professionalisation of editing in South Africa. In particular, it reports on an attitudinal survey done among editors, which aimed to gauge editors' perceptions and feelings about matters relating to skills, training, professionalisation and accreditation. The article also considers the professionalisation and accreditation processes for editors in Australia and Canada, and makes some suggestions for possible approaches to the professionalisation of the editing industry in South Africa.

Southern African Linguistics and Applied Language Studies 2008, 26(4): 479–493
Published
2009-01-23
Section
Articles

Journal Identifiers


eISSN: 1727-9461
print ISSN: 1607-3614