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Libyan Journal of Medicine

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Correlation between high-risk pregnancy and developmental delay in children aged 4-60 months

F Torabi, SAA Akbari, S Amiri, F Soleimani, HA Majd

Abstract


Background: The future development of children is considered more than ever now due to the advances in medical knowledge and thus the increase in survival rates of high-risk infants. This study investigated the correlation between high-risk pregnancy and developmental delay in children aged 4- 60 months.
Methods: This descriptive study was conducted on 401 mothers and their children (460 months) who visited health service centers affiliated to Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Iran, in 2011. Sampling was carried out in several stages, and the Ages and Stage Questionnaire was completed by the participants. Data were analyzed with SPSS 18 software and independent t-test; Mann-Whitney and logistic-regression tests were used.
Results: The average age of children in the low-risk pregnancy group was 22916 months, and that in the highrisk pregnancy group was 18.9914.8 months. The majority of children were female (53.1%). The prevalence of
high-risk pregnancies was 80.5%, and the prevalence of developmental delay was 18.7%. Multiple pregnancies, low birth weight, habitual abortions, maternal medical disorders in pregnancy, and gestational diabetes had significant correlations with developmental delay in children (PB0.04). In the logistic model, male gender, low birth weight, family marriage, and maternal medical disorders during pregnancy showed significant correlations with developmental delay in children (PB0.05). Additionally, abnormal body mass index (BMI) and social and economic status showed probability values close to the significance level (P0.05), whereas other high-risk pregnancy variables had no correlation with developmental delay in children. A correlation between high-risk pregnancy and developmental delay (P0.002) and fine motor delay was observed (P 0.02), but no correlation was observed between high-risk pregnancy and other developmental domains.
Conclusion: This study showed that some high-risk pregnancy variables had a significant correlation with developmental delay. Moreover, a significant correlation was observed between high-risk pregnancy and fine motor developmental delay.

Keywords: high-risk pregnancy; development delay; Ages and Stages Questionnaire




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