Workplace Stressors and Coping Strategies of Intensive Care Unit Nurses at University Teaching Hospitals, in Rwanda

  • Thomas Munyanziza Anesthesia Department, School of Health Sciences, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of Rwanda, Kigali, Rwanda
  • Busisiwe Bhengu Rory Meyers College of Nursing, New York University, New York, USA
  • Emelyne Umutoni Cishahayo School of Nursing and Midwifery, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of Rwanda, Kigali, Rwanda
  • Aline Uwase Anesthesia Department, School of Health Sciences, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of Rwanda, Kigali, Rwanda
Keywords: Workplace stressors, coping strategies, intensive care unit.

Abstract

Background

Nursing is widely known as a stressful profession but intensive care unit is the most stressful; when nurses fail to cope with workplace, stresses’ complications such as burnout and depression ensue, and this can compromise the quality of nursing care. In Rwanda, there is a limited literature about workplace stress and coping strategies.

Research objectives

To assess the workplace stress and coping strategies of intensive care unit nurses at University Teaching Hospitals.

Methodology

This study used a cross-sectional study design, recruited 92 ICU nurses through the census sampling method; ENSS and Brief COPE Inventory, while SPSS was used for data analysis. 

Results

Eighty percent experienced moderate to high stress, while 19.6% had low stress. Married nurses tend to experience high stress than singles, while those with Bachelors or Master’s degree were less likely to be stressed. Main stressors are care for suffering/dying, or agitated patients; and heavy workload, while main coping strategies were alcohol use, emotion support from friends and religion comfort.

Conclusions

Nurses experience workplace stress, while workplace stressors are nursing care for suffering/dying or agitated patients and heavy workload. The coping strategies were alcohol use, emotional support and comfort from religion.

Rwanda J Med Health Sci 2021;4(1):53-71

Published
2021-04-08
Section
Articles

Journal Identifiers


eISSN: 2616-9827
print ISSN: 2616-9819