Nursing and Midwifery Students’ Perceptions and Experiences of Using Blended Learning in Rwanda: A Qualitative Study

  • Jean Pierre Ndayisenga Arthur Labatt Family School of Nursing, Western University, London, Canada
  • Aimable Nkurunziza School of Nursing and Midwifery, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of Rwanda, Kigali, Rwanda
  • Donatilla Mukamana School of Nursing and Midwifery, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of Rwanda, Kigali, Rwanda
  • Josephine Murekezi King Faisal Hospital, Kigali, Rwanda
  • Yolanda Babenko-Mould Arthur Labatt Family School of Nursing, Western University, London, Canada
  • Yvonne Kasine Arthur Labatt Family School of Nursing, Western University, London, Canada
  • Olive Tengera Rwanda Association of Midwives, Kigali, Rwanda
  • Alice Muhayimana Department of Nursing Education, School of Therapeutic Sciences, University of Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa
  • Joy Bahumura School of Nursing and Midwifery, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of Rwanda, Kigali, Rwanda
  • Assumpta Yamuragiye School of Health Sciences, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of Rwanda, Kigali, Rwanda
  • Evans Marilyn Arthur Labatt Family School of Nursing, Western University, London, Canada
Keywords: Blended learning, learning, midwifery, nursing, Rwanda

Abstract

Background
Although blended learning (BL) is being adopted in public and private higher learning institutions (HLIs) in Rwanda, little is known about students’ use of BL in their learning activities. This article describes a qualitative descriptive study of students’ perceptions and experiences of BL in Rwanda’s post-secondary nursing and midwifery programs in public and private HLIs.
Methods
Thirty-three nursing and midwifery students from all public and private HLIs in Rwanda exposed to BL were invited to participate in three online focus group discussions (FGDs) conducted using a developed FGD guide with open-ended questions. Inductive content analysis was used to analyze the transcripts.
Results
Three main themes emerged from the data analysis:(1) BL perceived as a new and effective teaching and learning approach, (2) Contextual challenges to the BL method, and (3) Recommendations to improve the BL method. From students’ experiences, the benefits included but were not limited to the flexibility of the approach, time, and cost-saving. However, several challenges were identified, including technological issues such as lack of ICT skills and poor internet connectivity.
Conclusion
This study provides insights into the usefulness of BL in HLIs and offers recommendations on how BL teaching and learning can be improved to strengthen nursing and midwifery pre-service education quality.
Rwanda J Med Health Sci 2022;5(2):203-215

Published
2022-07-11
Section
Articles

Journal Identifiers


eISSN: 2616-9827
print ISSN: 2616-9819