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Tropical Journal of Health Sciences

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Prevalence of obesity among women attending a Nigerian primary care clinic.

A.M Ogunbode, M.M.A Ladipo, I.O Ajayi, O.O Ogunbode, L.A Adebusoye, A.A Fatiregun

Abstract


The objective was to determine the prevalence of obesity and associated risk factors among women in a Nigerian Out-Patient clinic. A pre-tested structured questionnaire was administered on women at the General Outpatients' Department (G.O.P.D.) of the University College Hospital (U.C.H.), Ibadan. The prevalence of obesity was 41.8%. Age was significantly associated with obesity, p=0.001. Majority of the obese participants (68.9%) in comparison to non obese (46.4%) were traders, p=0.001. Many of the obese respondents were married (82.6%) in comparison to non obese respondents who were widowed (67.4%), p=0.001. Many of the obese respondents were multiparous (44.3 %) having more than 4 children in comparison to the non obese respondents with the highest proportion of women with no children (36.1%), p=0.001. Fewer of the obese women had no formal education (28.1%) and no primary education (26.4%), in comparison to the non obese with 32.2% having secondary education and 27% having post-secondary education, p=0.015.Majority of the obese women (62.3%) were pre-menopausal in comparison to the non obese with 79.0% being pre-menopausal, p=0.001. Multivariate analysis done using logistic regression showed that risk factors for obesity included age group 50-59 years (Odds Ratio 15.914, 95% CI=1.389-182.26, p=0.026), and being menopausal (Odds Rat io 1.452. 95%CI=0.587-3.594,p=0.017).Having greater than five children was also found to be a risk factor for obesity (OR=3.321,95%CI=1.236-8.921,p=0.017). The prevalence of obesity among Nigerian women remains high. There is a need to plan and implement measures for control.

Keywords: Prevalence, obesity, women, primary care, Nigeria.




http://dx.doi.org/10.4314/tjhc.v17i1.52812
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