GeoGebra integration and effectiveness in the teaching and learning of mathematics in secondary schools: A review of literature

  • Marie Sagesse Uwurukundo African Centre of Excellence for Innovative Teaching and Learning Mathematics and Science, University of Rwanda - College of Education
  • Jean François Maniraho University of Rwanda - College of Education
  • Michael Tusiime University of Rwanda - College of Education
Keywords: GeoGebra integration, GeoGebra effectiveness, mathematical domains, teaching and learning mathematics, attitudes towards GeoGebra

Abstract

This article explores studies that investigated GeoGebra integration and its effectiveness in teaching and learning mathematics. The study examines existing studies on how and why GeoGebra enhanced students’ performance; understanding, analytical thinking, generalization, abstract thinking, representation, and logical thinking. By a deep exploration of the main construct of the study, we collected and analyzed 20 studies whose results reported that GeoGebra added values when applied in teaching and learning in different mathematical domains. The reviewed literature identified four domains in Mathematics: Geometry, Algebra, Calculus, and Trigonometry that was studied. The majority of the reviewed studies investigated the integration of GeoGebra in Geometry and few studies were found in other mathematical domains. The literature ascertains that students can explore independently the software and acquire mathematical concepts with minimum assistance from the teacher. The results from the reviewed literature, on the one hand, indicated 16/20 or (80 %) of the studies generally showed that GeoGebra is effective in teaching and learning Mathematics since GeoGebra contributed in enhancing students’ understanding of mathematical concepts and improved students’ interest to learn mathematics. On the other hand, only 4/20 studies or (20%) showed non-effectiveness of GeoGebra since students in both experimental and control groups did not show the difference in their performance after being both given post-tests or an interview. This may indicate that although GeoGebra seems to be largely effective, such effectiveness is dependent on the way it is integrated into the teaching and learning process. Therefore, we recommend that other research should step up investigating why most of the studies were found in the Geometry domain and few in other domains.

Author Biographies

Marie Sagesse Uwurukundo, African Centre of Excellence for Innovative Teaching and Learning Mathematics and Science, University of Rwanda - College of Education

University of Rwanda - College of Education

Jean François Maniraho, University of Rwanda - College of Education

University of Rwanda - College of Education

Michael Tusiime, University of Rwanda - College of Education

University of Rwanda - College of Education

Published
2020-09-04
Section
Articles

Journal Identifiers


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print ISSN: 2508-1128